McKibbin, W.F., Pham, M.N., & Shackelford, T.K. (2013). Investigating human sperm competition in post-industrial ecologies: Cues to sperm competition predict pornographic DVD sales rank. Behavioral Ecology, 24, 819-823.

Investigating human sperm competition in post-industrial ecologies: Cues to sperm competition predict pornographic DVD sales rank.

McKibbin, W.F., Pham, M.N., & Shackelford, T.K.

 

Sperm competition theory has been used to generate the hypothesis that men prefer to view pornographic images suggesting the presence of a rival male, over images which do not. The current research uses a new methodology to address conflicting evidence about men’s preferences for pornographic images. Raters coded a random sample of 166 pornographic DVDs (from a population of 49 493), which were then analyzed using multiple regression. Consistent with the hypothesis generated from sperm competition theory, the number of images on a DVD cover and screenshots depicting 2 or more men interacting with 1 woman (suggesting the presence of sperm competition) predicts DVD sales rank, whereas the number of images on a DVD cover and screenshots depicting 2 or more women interacting with 1 man (suggesting the absence of sperm competition) does not predict DVD sales rank. Discussion addresses limitations and future directions, including using penile plethysmography to avoid relying on correlational analyses.

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McKibbin, W.F., & Shackelford, T.K. (2013). Comment on “Reexamining individual differences in women’s rape avoidance”, by Snyder and Fessler (2012). Archives of Sexual Behavior, 42, 1-4.

Comment on “Reexamining individual differences in women’s rape avoidance”, by Snyder and Fessler (2012).

William F. McKibbin and Todd K. Shackelford

 

Recently, Snyder and Fessler (in press) published in Archives of Sexual Behavior an article entitled “Reexamining individual differences in women’s rape avoidance”. This article was written in response to an article we published in Archives of Sexual Behavior (McKibbin, Shackelford, Miner, Bates, & Liddle, 2011). Snyder and Fessler (hereafter referred to as S&F)
criticized our work on both theoretical and empirical grounds. We thank these authors for their interest in our work. In this letter, we address their criticisms and problems associated with each criticism.

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McKibbin, W.F. (2013, February 17). Why do we orgasm at all? HuffPost TED Weekends. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/william-mckibbin/male-orgasm-research_b_2697390.html (Invited submission.)

Why do we orgasm at all?

William McKibbin.

 

Scientific study of the orgasm has revealed some fascinating results, as seen in Mary Roach’s TEDTalk. Her presentation is informative, titillating and to some perhaps scandalous. As a scientist who specializes in the study of sexual behavior, I especially appreciated her talk. But what drew me to science is my constant need to ask ‘why’. Why do people behave the way they do? What is the purpose or design in an anatomical or behavioral trait? Regarding orgasm, readers may be surprised to learn this is a hot debate.

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Starratt, V. G., McKibbin, W. F., & Shackelford, T. K. (2013). Experimental manipulation of psychological mechanisms responsive to female infidelity. Personality and Individual Differences, 55, 59-62.

Experimental manipulation of psychological mechanisms responsive to female infidelity.

Starratt, V. G., McKibbin, W. F., & Shackelford, T. K.

 

Recent research indicates that men may have evolved mechanisms dedicated to detecting and responding to the risk of partner infidelity. Because activation of these ‘‘anti-cuckoldry’’ mechanisms depends onpartner infidelity, or the perception of partner infidelity, existing evidence for suchmechanisms relies oncorrelational data. The current study tests several predictions regarding men’s anti-cuckoldry mecha-nisms in an experimental design. As predicted, the results demonstrated: (1a) experimental activation of men’s anti-cuckoldry mechanisms by presenting them with a vignette depicting a female partner’s sexual infidelity; (1b) no activation of men’s anti-cuckoldry mechanisms by presenting them with a vignette depicting a sexual encounter without female infidelity; (2) experimental activation of men’s anti-cuckoldry mechanisms was influenced by their perceived risk of partner infidelity; and (3) women wernot influenced by the partner infidelity manipulation.

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