McKibbin, W.F., Miner, E.J., Shackelford, T.K., Ehrke, A.D., & Weekes-Shackelford, V.A. Men’s mate retention varies with men’s personality and their partner’s personality. Personality and Individual Differences, 56, 62-67.

Men’s mate retention varies with men’s personality and their partner’s personality.

McKibbin, W.F., Miner, E.J., Shackelford, T.K., Ehrke, A.D., & Weekes-Shackelford, V.A.

 

Mate retention is the recurrent adaptive problem of retaining a mate in a relationship. Humans may have evolved mechanisms which motivate behavior in response to this problem. We examined the relationship between men’s mate retention and men’s and their partner’s personality in studies of 467 men and 565 women in committed relationships. Participants reported on their own or their partner’s mate retention and both their own and their partner’s personality. Results indicate a negative relationship between men’s Emotional Stability and men’s mate retention and a positive relationship between men’s Agreeableness and men’s benefit-provisioning mate retention. Discussion addresses limitations and directions for future research addressing the links between personality and mate retention

Read more

Starratt, V. G., McKibbin, W. F., & Shackelford, T. K. (2013). Experimental manipulation of psychological mechanisms responsive to female infidelity. Personality and Individual Differences, 55, 59-62.

Experimental manipulation of psychological mechanisms responsive to female infidelity.

Starratt, V. G., McKibbin, W. F., & Shackelford, T. K.

 

Recent research indicates that men may have evolved mechanisms dedicated to detecting and responding to the risk of partner infidelity. Because activation of these ‘‘anti-cuckoldry’’ mechanisms depends onpartner infidelity, or the perception of partner infidelity, existing evidence for suchmechanisms relies oncorrelational data. The current study tests several predictions regarding men’s anti-cuckoldry mecha-nisms in an experimental design. As predicted, the results demonstrated: (1a) experimental activation of men’s anti-cuckoldry mechanisms by presenting them with a vignette depicting a female partner’s sexual infidelity; (1b) no activation of men’s anti-cuckoldry mechanisms by presenting them with a vignette depicting a sexual encounter without female infidelity; (2) experimental activation of men’s anti-cuckoldry mechanisms was influenced by their perceived risk of partner infidelity; and (3) women wernot influenced by the partner infidelity manipulation.

Read more

McKibbin, W.F., Bates, V.M., Shackelford, T.K., Hafen, C.A., & LaMunyon, C.W. (2010). Risk of sperm competition moderates the relationship between men’s satisfaction with their partner and men’s interest in their partner’s copulatory orgasm. Personality and Individual Differences, 49, 961-966

Risk of sperm competition moderates the relationship between men’s satisfaction with their partner and men’s interest in their partner’s copulatory orgasm

William F. McKibbin, Vincent M. Bates, Todd K. Shackelford,
Christopher A. Hafen, and Craig W. LaMunyon

 

Sperm competition occurs when the sperm of multiple males concurrently occupy a female’s reproductive
tract and compete for fertilization. Sperm competition may have been a recurrent adaptive problem over human evolutionary history (Shackelford & Pound, 2006). Women’s orgasm may facilitate selective uptake and retention of a particular man’s sperm (Thornhill & Gangestad, 2008). Men who are more satisfied with and invested in their relationship may experience greater costs in the event of sperm competition and potential cuckoldry. Therefore, these men may be especially interested in ensuring their partner’s copulatory orgasm. We hypothesized that men’s relationship satisfaction and investment would predict interest in their partner’s copulatory orgasm, and that sperm competition risk would moderate the association between relationship satisfaction and interest in partner’s copulatory orgasm. Using structural equation modeling on self-report data secured from 229 men in a committed heterosexual relationship, we tested and found support for these hypotheses.

Read more

McKibbin, W. F., Shackelford, T.K., Goetz, A.T., Bates, V.M. Starratt, V.G., & Miner, E.J. (2009). Development and Initial Psychometric Assessment of the Rape Avoidance Inventory. Personality and Individual Differences, 39, 336-340.

 Development and initial psychometric assessment of the
rape avoidance inventory

William F. McKibbin, Todd K. Shackelford, Aaron T. Goetz, Vincent M. Bates,
Valerie G. Starratt, Emily J. Miner

 

 Rape is a traumatic event with severe consequences for women. Therefore, women may have evolved
psychological mechanisms that motivate them to avoid circumstances linked with rape. We present the development and initial psychometric assessment of an inventory designed to assess women’s rape avoidance behaviors. In Study 1 (N = 99), we conducted an act nomination procedure to identify specific behaviors for inclusion in a preliminary rape avoidance inventory. In Study 2 (N = 144), we secured performance reports for the behaviors assessed by the inventory. We present the results of principal components analyses and the construction of the rape avoidance inventory (RAI). We identified four components of women’s rape avoidance behaviors as assessed by the RAI: avoid strange men, avoid appearing sexually receptive, avoid being alone, and awareness of surroundings/defensive preparedness. We demonstrate that, as predicted, performance of rape avoidance behaviors is negatively associated with a measure of interest in and pursuit of short-term sex. We conclude that the RAI is a useful tool for future research on rape avoidance and rape prevention

Read more

Buss, D. M., Shackelford, T. K., & McKibbin, W. F. (2008). The Mate Retention Inventory-Short Form (MRI-SF). Personality and Individual Differences, 44, 322-334.

 The Mate Retention Inventory-Short Form (MRI-SF)

David M. Buss a, Todd K. Shackelford b, William F. McKibbin b

  University of Texas, Austin
Florida Atlantic University

 People devote considerable effort to retaining their mates. Mate retention tactics range from vigilance to
violence, and are linked to variables such as marital satisfaction and relationship aggression. The Mate
Retention Inventory (MRI; 104 items comprising 19 tactics) has proven to be reliable and valid. Given
the importance of assessing mate retention in various contexts, there is a need for a briefer version of
the MRI. In Study 1 (N = 1032), we develop a short form of the MRI (the MRI-SF), which assesses performance
of 19 mate retention tactics using two items per tactic. The tactic scales show internal consistency,
high correlations with the MRI long-form tactic scales, and links with assessments of controlling behavior,
relationship violence, and an assessment of injury. Study 2 (N = 625) replicates the MRI-SF reliability and
high correlations with the MRI long-form tactic scales, and shows links to a sexual coercion measure. We
conclude that the MRI-SF is sufficiently reliable and valid that it can be used in basic and applied research
in place of the MRI long-form for most purposes.

Read more

McKibbin, W. F., Goetz, A. T., Shackelford, T. K., Schipper, L., Starratt, V. G., & Stewart-Williams, S. (2007). Why do men insult their partners? Personality and Individual Differences, 43, 231-241.

Why do men insult their intimate partners?

William F. McKibbin a, Aaron T. Goetz a, Todd K. Shackelford a, Lucas D. Schipper a, Valerie G. Starratt a, Steve Stewart-Williams b

aFlorida Atlantic University
b McMaster University

 

Men sometimes insult their intimate partners and these insults predict intimate partner violence. No research has investigated the function of men’s partner-directed insults. We hypothesize that men’s partner-directed
insults are designed to retain their long-term mate and, therefore, that men’s use of partner-directed insults will covary with other mate retention behaviors. Using the mate retention inventory and the partner-directed insults scale, we conducted two studies to test this hypothesis. Study 1 included 245 men who reported their mate retention behaviors and partner-directed insults. Correlations and multiple regression analyses documented the predicted relationships between men’s partner-directed insults and mate retention behaviors. Study 2 included 372 women who reported their partner’s mate retention behaviors and insults that their partner-directed at them. The results replicated the results of Study 1. Discussion highlights future directions for investigating the relationships between men’s partner-directed insults and mate retention behaviors.

Read more